Quantcast
'Full Frontal' Confronts Republicans On Black Lives Matter

'Full Frontal' Confronts Republicans On Black Lives Matter

'Full Frontal' Confronts Republicans On Black Lives Matter

The Republican National Convention is now behind us and the Democratic National Convention has begun. But there’s still a lot of comedic gold to be had from the former, such as this segment from Full Frontal With Samantha Bee.

The Full Frontal staff (minus Bee) goes around asking people at the RNC about “Black Lives Matter,” a.k.a. the dreaded three words that no Republican can bring themselves to say without mentioning “All Lives Matter” in the same sentence. The exchanges are hilarious, so much so that we’ve ranked some of our favorites in no particular order:

Black guy wearing a cowboy hat (2:20): I literally laughed out loud when the reporter asked him how many times he’s been pulled over by a cop, and he responded with “No comment.”

White guy wearing a “Make RNC Fair Again” cap (2:35): “If you wanted to yell ‘I love white people!’ this is the place.”

White woman with red rose clip in her hair (3:25): “All lives matter! I knew — I totally knew that — this is the weirdest thing.”

White guy in blue tie (4:40): “Your chances of being shot by the police are non-existent.” Of course he follows up this argument with respectability politics and not giving cops a reason to shoot someone. Sure, this works in the fantasy world of white privilege in which you inhabit, but not for black people. Have you not been keeping up with the news? Charles Kinsey? Philando Castile? This is why Black Lives Matter. But please continue to tell us how getting shot by the police is “non-existent.” This man is also a state senate candidate by the way.

But the video does end on a more optimistic note, with several of the people spoken to wanting to know more about Black Lives Matter (more than likely because they’re being confronted by a black reporter about it). One woman tells the reporter how she’s always concerned with saying the “wrong” thing to black people and upsetting them, something she worries about all the time. To constantly fear that something you say or do to someone will possibly provoke them in a certain way? If only she realized the irony in her statement, but at the very least she engaged in a dialogue that most white people are afraid to have.

Check out the video below.



Our Newsletter

Follow us on Social Media