Post Malone, Creator Of Hit Song “Rockstar,” Believes It’s A ‘Struggle Being A White Rapper’

Elijah C. Watson Elijah Watson serves as Okayplayer's News & Culture Editor. When…
Post Malone, Creator Of Hit Song "Rockstar," Believes It's A 'Struggle Being A White Rapper'
Source: YouTube
Post Malone, Creator Of Hit Song "Rockstar," Believes It's A 'Struggle Being A White Rapper'

Source: YouTube

Although Post Malone had the number one song throughout several countries with “Rockstar,” the artist believes it is a “struggle being a white rapper.”

READ: Nicki Minaj Says ‘It’s A Great Time To Be A White Rapper In America’

The remark was part of a response Malone offered in an interview with GQ, when asked: “Do you, Post Malone, ever feel anxious about working in a primarily black-identified genre of music?”

“I definitely feel like there’s a struggle being a white rapper. But I don’t want to be a rapper. I just want to be a person that makes music,” he responds. “I make music that I like and I think that kicks ass, that I think the people who fuck with me as a person and as an artist will like.”

The comment has resulted in some backlash for Malone on social media, with many critics referencing the commercial success of “Rockstar.”

https://twitter.com/KiidJoshua1995/status/956814182325899264?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.teenvogue.com%2Fstory%2Fpost-malone-white-rapper-struggle-comment

https://twitter.com/Forslaytion/status/956707222213550081?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.teenvogue.com%2Fstory%2Fpost-malone-white-rapper-struggle-comment

Malone has faced criticism before for remarks he made involving rap music culture. Back in November of last year the artist said that “nobody is talking about real s**t” in hip-hop.

“If you’re looking for lyrics, if you’re looking to cry, if you’re looking to think about life, don’t listen to hip-hop,” Post said to NewOnce. “There’s great hip-hop songs where they talk about life and they spit that real s**t, but right now, there’s not a lot of people talking about real s**t. Whenever I want to cry, whenever I want to sit down and have a nice cry, I’ll listen to some Bob Dylan.”

Maybe Malone’s response in this GQ interview stems from the criticisms he has received from being a white rapper which, of course, duh. As an artist participating in what is a predominantly and historically black genre of music, you’re going to be held accountable and scrutinized as a white artist for disparaging remarks you make about rap music, especially when you’re also profiting off it.

Source: GQ

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