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The Harvard Law Review Has Elected Its First Ever Black Woman President

The Harvard Law Review Has Elected Its First-Ever Black Woman President

by Elijah C. Watson
January 31, 2017 11:50 AM

The Harvard Law Review Has Elected Its First Ever Black Woman President

The Harvard Law Review has elected its first ever black woman president.

Imelme Umana, who is a part of Harvard Law School’s 2018 graduation class, was selected as President of the Harvard Law Review, with the announcement made through the Harvard Black Law School Association’s Twitter account this past Sunday.

Umana has made history (read: herstory) not only for the selection, but whose footsteps she follows in. After all, former president Barack Obama was the first black person to serve as President of the Harvard Law Review back in 1990.

According to a report from Clutch, Umana is a doctorate candidate at the Harvard Law School, and is “interested in the intersection between government and African American studies by exploring how stereotypes of black women are reproduced and reinforced in American Political discourse.”

In other news of young black woman making history, a 22-year-old woman is running for mayor of Detroit.

Myya D. Jones, who is currently a Michigan State University senior, made the announcement earlier this month during an interview with the Detroit Metro Times, that she wanted to run for the position.

“While I was interning in Congress, I knew [politics] was something I wanted to do,” Jones said. “I want to give the voiceless a voice.”

Jones hopes to revitalize the city, meaning everything from improving neighborhoods and focusing on the city’s longtime residents in parts of downtown and midtown Detroit, to creating a better police force.

“We can’t forget about the people who have to live in Detroit,” Jones said. “We need to create more opportunities for people to have jobs, for them to be financially literate.”

“I have lots of plans for the neighborhoods,” Jones added. “I want people to be able to walk down the street and go to the park. I want to clean up our streets and make sure we have block clubs and neighborhood clubs. I want to make sure people feel a responsibility to their neighborhood. Right now those things aren’t happening.”



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