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Chicago Lawmakers Want To Make Barack Obama's Birthday A State Holiday

Chicago Lawmakers Want To Make Barack Obama's Birthday A State Holiday

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Lawmakers in Chicago are trying to make Barack Obama‘s birthday a holiday.

According to a report from ABC 7 Chicago, three bills have been introduced that would all make Obama’s birthday, August 4, an official holiday called “Barack Obama Day.”

Two of the bills, proposed by Democratic Representatives Andre Thapedi and Sonya Harper, would change the date into a “legal holiday,” meaning that all state government offices would shut down, while schools and businesses would have the option of closing.

The third one, which is a Senate bill co-sponsored by Democratic Senator Jacqueline Collins, would make the date commemorative.

Last year, Thapedi attempted to make “Barack Obama Day” a state holiday, but was unsuccessful.

“This bill is even stronger this year now that Obama is no longer in the White House,” Thapedi said. “Last year, there were some concerns, honoring a sitting president. Now that he’s no longer a sitting president, it’s even more appropriate.”

Obama has currently been enjoying himself since leaving the White House. Barack and Michelle recently ventured to the British Virgin Islands to decompress, and hang out with entrepreneur Richard Branson. A part of their hanging out also included Barack learning how to kitesurf and Richard learning how to foilboard, with the two competing against each other after getting some of the basics of their respective watersport down. Ultimately, Obama won.

Hopefully, following his vacation, Barack will release a memoir of his time as president, which he could possibly receive $20 million for.

“There’s no doubt Obama’s memoir will go for more than any president’s has ever gone,” Esther Newberg, co-head of ICM Partners’ publishing unit, said in an interview.

“There is broader fascination with Obama, from conservatives who really hate him as well as liberals who deeply admire what he did,” Julian Zelizer, Presidential historian for Princeton University, added.



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