J. Cole’s Forest Hills Drive Home Struck By Tree During Hurricane Florence

Elijah C. Watson Elijah Watson serves as Okayplayer's News & Culture Editor. When…
J. Cole's Forest Hills Drive Home Struck By Tree During Hurricane Florence
Source: YouTube
J. Cole's Forest Hills Drive Home Struck By Tree During Hurricane Florence

Source: YouTube

J. Cole‘s childhood home was hit by Hurricane Florence.

The rapper’s home on Forest Hills Drive in Fayetteville, North Carolina, was struck by a large tree as a result of the hurricane, although it’s unknown how much damage the tree did, according to The Fayetteville Observer.

The house was made famous by Cole’s third studio album, 2014 Forest Hills Drive. He even held a listening session for the album at the home for a select group of fans.

The rapper was also slated to have his inaugural Dreamville Festival in Raleigh this weekend but the event was canceled because of Hurricane Florence.

In related news, South Carolina officials refused to evacuate 650 inmates at a medium-security prison prior to Hurricane Florence’s arrival in the state.

Prison inmates at MacDougall Correctional Institution weren’t removed and relocated according to a report from Vice News.

“Previously, it’s been safer to stay in place with the inmates rather than move to another location,” South Carolina Department of Corrections spokesperson Dexter Lee said.

As the State, a South Carolina newspaper, notes, the Ridgeland Correctional Institution also wasn’t evacuated. Originally, an evacuation order was placed in both Berkeley County and Jasper County — Where MacDougall and Ridgeland are at, respectively — but the latter’s evacuation order has been lifted following changes in the hurricane forecast.

South Carolina has not evacuated prisons in response to hurricanes since 1999 according to a report from the Post and Courier last year. A prison spokesperson told the Post and Courier at the time, “In most cases, it is safer for the public, officers, and inmates for an SCDC facility to hold in place rather than transfer and hold in a secondary location.”

Source: The Fayetteville Observer

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