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This All-Time Terrible Best Rapper List Is Why Joe Budden Is Trending

This All-Time Terrible Best Rapper List Is Why Joe Budden Is Trending

This All-Time Terrible Best Rapper List Is Why Joe Budden Is Trending

Photo by Bennett Raglin/Getty Images for Revolt

Update: Ebro and Peter Rosenberg from Hot 97 released their own top 50 list to combat the list that featured Joe Budden at three.

Reaction to their list has been divisive:

Scroll down to see the original story. 

Some people even think Joe Budden himself made the list.

It’s common to see a best rapper list hit social media and incite a passionate discourse amongst fans almost every week, if not every other week. However, one list recently surfaced on social media that has left plenty of users confused because of how high it places Joe Budden on its roster of best rappers.

On Monday morning, The Brew Podcast shared a list of the “Top 50 Greatest Rappers of All-Time.” The list, which is in order, finds Jay-Z and Nas in the number one and two spot, respectively, only to then show Budden at number three.

Yes, Budden is in the top three alongside Nas and Jay-Z.

Needless to say, a handful of people have not only spoken out against the entire list (it was noticeably absent of women rappers, which Questlove acknowledged) but Budden’s ranking specifically.

Some people even think Budden himself wrote the list.

Budden later made a comment that seemed to be directed at the list, tweeting: “The internet only unifies at my expense lol.”

“& y’all gonna stop disrespecting the greatness of Pump It Up,” he said in another tweet.

At least Black Thought is in the top five though. The Roots MC reminded rap fans of his lyrical dexterity two years ago when he appeared on Funkmaster Flex‘s freestyle series and rapped over Mobb Deep’s “Burn.”

Shortly after the freestyle surfaced online, Thought revealed that it was a combination of improvised and written.

“It absolutely was a combination, as it would have to be. I mean, I’m no superhero. I’m definitely an adamant professional, and I feel like I’ve mastered the craft. But it’s just changed,” he previously said. “If I were on Stretch & Bobbito back in the day, like when I would go to their radio show and freestyle, everything had to be completely off the top. And, you know, I’m able to do that with the best of them. But in order to say what is needed, to get a rise out of young audiences, the 18-to-25s. … You know, I have a couple of boys who are 17, 18 years old…and in order to get that sort of response from them, it has to be a combination [of improvisation and pre-written].”

It’s also worth noting that Lloyd Banks, who’s listed as number 50 on the list, responded to his placement on it too.



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