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H&M Hires Global Diversity Leader Following 'Racist' Monkey Hoodie Controversy

H&M Hires Global Diversity Leader Following 'Racist' Monkey Hoodie Controversy

H&M Hires Global Diversity Leader Following 'Racist' Monkey Hoodie Controversy

Source: CNN

In light of the ongoing controversy centered around a photo of a young black boy modeling a hoodie with the phrase “Coolest Monkey in the Jungle,” H&M has hired a global diversity leader to address “diversity and inclusiveness.”

READ: Parents Of H&M Child Model Forced To Move Out Of Their Home Amid ‘Racist’ Monkey Hoodie Backlash

The recent incident was entirely unintentional, but it demonstrates so clearly how big our responsibility is as a global…

Posted by H&M on Tuesday, January 16, 2018

“The recent incident was entirely unintentional, but it demonstrates so clearly how big our responsibility is as a global brand,” the statement read according to a report from the Associated Press. “We have reached out, around the world, inside and outside H&M to get feedback. Our commitment to addressing diversity and inclusiveness is genuine, therefore we have appointed a global leader, in this area, to drive our work forward.”

Annie Wu, the company’s global manager for employee relations, has been selected for the position. However, it is unknown what her duties and responsibilities will entail.

Recently, the parents of the H&M model, Liam Mango, publicly spoke about the incident.

Appearing on ITV’s This Morning on Monday, Terry Mango and Frank Odhiambo, Liam’s mother and father, respectively, spoke on the backlash H&M has received from the picture. Mango, who had previously told people to “get over it” in regards to the picture on Facebook, said that the image did not trigger a reaction from her initially.

“I wouldn’t see such a connection to anything other than my son modeling a shirt,” she said. “Until the controversy now, with the whole furore that is going on, then you kind of look back and wonder if you had noticed it, what would be our, or my, initial response to it.”

The family is hoping to return to living a “normal family life,” having been forced to move out of their home in Stockholm, Sweden following the controversy.

“As much as people have gotten involved in this, for me it’s very important that people understand that me and Teresa, we have a son, we have other children in the home that we are raising, and we have an obligation to protect our children,” Odhiambo said.

Source: Associated Press



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